Tag Archives: Users

Fedora’s FESCo Approves Of A “Sane” Approach For Counting Fedora Users Via DNF


FEDORA --

Monday’s weekly Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee approved of a means for the DNF package manager to integrate some user counting capabilities as long as it’s a “sane” approach and not the UUID-driven proposal originally laid out.

Originally the plan was to come up with a new UUID identifier system just for counting Fedora users so those in the Fedora project and at Red Hat can have a better idea for the number of Fedora users and other insights. But the concept of having a unique identifier for Fedora users wasn’t well received, even if it was trying to not track users or reveal other personal information.

Baked over the past month was a new privacy-minded plan for counting users via DNF that relies upon a “countme” bit that will be incremented weekly or so and not have any UUID as originally envisioned. See that earlier article for more details on this current plan.

During Monday’s FESCo meeting, the members voted in favor of the plan as long as “the actual implementation is sane.” That was laid out in the meeting minutes.

We’ll see if this new DNF “countme” user counter gets wrapped up time for this spring’s Fedora 30 release or will be delayed until Fedora 31 in the autumn. At the FESCo meeting they also officially approved having GCC 9 be the default system compiler, which was widely expected anyhow given their preference for always shipping with the latest GNU compiler and in fact the developers had already landed the new compiler into Rawhide in its near-final state.


Arch Linux Users With Intel Graphics Can Begin Enjoying A Flicker-Free Boot


HARDWARE --

It looks like the recent efforts led by Red Hat / Fedora on providing a flicker-free Linux boot experience and thanks to their upstream-focused approach is starting to pay off for the other desktop Linux distributions… A flicker-free boot experience can now be achieved on Arch Linux with the latest packages, assuming you don’t have any quirky hardware.

A Phoronix reader reported in earlier today that Arch Linux as of the 4.19.8-arch1-1-ARCH kernel is working out well for the seamless/flicker-free boot experience. The caveat though — like with Fedora — is that it only works with Intel graphics hardware/driver for now and does require setting the “i915.fastboot=1” kernel module parameter.

Previously this user had to use “quiet splash vt.global_cursor_default=0 rd.loglevel=0 systemd.show_status=false rd.udev.log-priority=0 udev.log-priority=0” for trying to achieve a similar boot experience.

It doesn’t appear to have yet worked its way into Arch, but Red Hat also recently landed Plymouth improvements for even tighter integration on modern Intel UEFI systems (a Fedora video also in that aforelinked article).

The non-rolling-release Linux distributions should begin seeing the fruits of this open-source work in their 2019 updates.


Storage Management Software: Users Weigh In


Data storage never seems to stop evolving in ways that challenge IT departments. Aside from the need to deal with perpetual growth, data storage now requires management across cloud and on-premises infrastructure as well as hybrid environment. Different workloads also require varying service levels from storage solutions. Storage management tools have had to keep up with this rapid change.

Storage management tools give storage managers a way to stay on top of storage systems. They enable storage managers to track utilization, monitor performance and more. What do users actually think of storage management tools on the market today?

The discussion about storage management software on IT Central Station reveals that storage is about more than just storing data. It’s about keeping businesses running optimally. When customers can’t see their data, that’s not a storage problem. It’s a business problem. For this reason, storage managers appreciate storage management solutions that offer real time visibility into storage performance and the ability to compare relative performance from multiple storage systems. They like products that are responsive and efficient to use, with a “single pane of glass” and automated alerting.

The following reviews from IT Central Station users highlight the pros and cons of two top storage management software products: NetApp OnCommand Insight and Dell EMC ControlCenter.

NetApp OnCommand Insight

A storage administrator at a financial services company who goes by the handle StorageA7774, cited the product’s comprehensive view:

“Since we have to monitor multiple systems, it gives us a single pane of glass to look at all of our environments. Also, to compare and contrast, if one environment is having some issues, we can judge it against the other environments to make sure everything is on par with one another. In the financial services industry, customer responsiveness is very important. Financial advisors cannot sit in front of a customer and say, ‘I can’t get your data.’ Thus, being up and running and constantly available is a very important area for our client.”

Carter B., a storage administrator at a manufacturing company, cited a several ways OnCommand Insight helps his organization:

“The tracking of utilization of our storage systems; seeing the throughput—these are the most important metrics for having a working operating system and working storage system. It’s centralized. It’s got a lot of data in there. We can utilize the data that’s in there and the output to other systems to run scripts off of it. Therefore, it’s pretty versatile.”

However, a systems administrator at a real estate/law firm with the handle SystemsA3a53, noted a small drawback:

“There was a minor issue where we were receiving a notification that a cluster was not available, or communication to the cluster. OnCommand Manager could not reach a cluster, which is really much like a false positive. The minor issues were communications within the systems.”

And StorageA970f, a storage architect at a government agency, suggested an improvement to the tool’s interface:

“Maybe a little bit more graphical interface. Right now — and this is going to sound really weird — but whatever the biggest server is, the one that is utilizing the most storage space, instead of showing me that server and how much storage space, it just shows it to you in a big font. Literally in a big font. That’s it. So if your server is named Max and you’ve got another server named Sue, and Max is taking up most of your space, all it’s going to show is just Max is big, Sue is little. That’s is really weird, because I really want to see more than that. You can click on Max, drill down in and see the stuff. But I would rather, on my front interface, say, ‘Oh, gosh, Max is using 10 terabytes. Sue is only using one. She’s fixing to choke. Let me move some of this over.’”

Dell EMC ControlCenter

Gianfranco L., data manager at a tech services company, described how Dell EMC ControlCenter helps his organization:

“We use the SNMP gateway to aggregate hardware and performance events. The alerting feature is valuable because it completes the gap of storage monitoring. Often the storage comes with a tele-diagnostic service. For security purposes, it’s very important for us to be aware of every single failure in order to be more proactive and not only reactive.”
 

Bharath P., senior storage consultant at a financial services firm, described what he likes about the product.

“Centralized administration and management of SAN environment in the organization are valuable features. Improvements to my organization include ease of administration and that it fits in well with all the EMC SAN storage”

However, Hari K., senior infrastructure analyst at a financial services firm, said there’s room for improvement with EMC ControlCenter:

“It needed improvement with its stability. Also, since it was agent-based communication, we always had to ensure that the agents were running on the servers all the time.”

Gianfranco L., also cited an area where the product could do better:

“The use of agents is not easy. The architectural design of using every single agent for every type of storage can be reviewed with the use of general proxies. The general proxies also discover other vendors’ storage. This can be done with custom made scripts.”



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Hyperconverged Infrastructure: What Do Users Think?


Hyperconvergence burst onto the IT scene a few years ago and remains one of the hottest trends in IT today. Vendors promise greater efficiency and agility with hyperconverged infrastructure. But what do IT pros who use the technology have to say?

Members of IT Central Station, a community of more than 250,000 IT pros who contribute enterprise technology reviews based on their experience, provided insight into leading hyperconverged infrastructure products. They cited features they love in HPE SimpliVity, Nutanix, and VMware vSAN, along with product shortcomings.

Since virtualized workloads are becoming more prevalent, IT Central Station members have found that hyperconverged infrastructure offers organizations the benefit of removing previously separate storage networks. Hyperconverged systems are flexible and can be expanded by adding nodes to the base unit.

HPE SimpliVity

Charlene H., senior systems administrator at a healthcare company, described her positive experience with HPE SimpliVity:  

“The ease of managing this system! Recently added the All Flash CN3400F and oh my goodness, are these nodes fast as lighting! I love having a private cloud for my organization. Public cloud will never care for my organization’s data more than I do.”

Tommy H., senior systems/storage engineer at Banc of California, described the value that HPE SimpliVity’s backup capabilities have added to his organization:

“Backups are all automatic and admins do not have to worry if the production VMs are being backed up. Easy backup policy with no LUN administration is also one less task to worry about. DR and DR replication are no longer an issue; no longer have to seed a SAN locally and ship it out to the DR site.”

However, a senior cloud data architect who uses HPE SimpliVity said improvements could be made to both its data storage and data replication capabilities:

“I would like to see replication to a cloud solution. I would like to replicate the data so that we have a backup copy off-site. I could then be comfortable getting rid of our existing backup solution….The other feature would be a single copy of the data storage as opposed to a dual copy. In that way, when I do things that automatically have dual copies, such as with our SQL server databases, I would not then be making four copies of the data.”

A senior systems administrator at a consultancy company would like to see other improvements:

“There are some maintenance features (replica copy load-balancing) that could stand to be automated and/or streamlined for customer execution.…Also, the ability to scale compute and storage independently of one another would be a way to add value to the entire product line.”

Nutanix

A cyber security engineer at a technology services company explained why he likes Nutanix:

“Hyperconvergence is the most valuable feature for me, as it allows me to scale the hardware accordingly to project requirements…It is now our single most powerful server that is easily scalable and has an HTML5 site that manages all aspects of the system.”

An enterprise systems and IT architect at a technology services company described the improvements that Nutanix has brought to his organization:

“There was a 30% reduction in CAPEX spending when we moved towards the Nutanix platform and we had a high ROI.”

A systems engineer at a university cited room for improvement:  

“The improvement needed is for elastic clusters, meaning the ability to depart and join nodes in an automatic way. We have a laboratory that needs to perform bare metal tests and therefore needs to unjoin the nodes from the cluster and later on join them back.”

Leandro L., system architect at a technology services company, suggested that Nutanix improve its asynchronous replication capabilities:

“I would like to see asynchronous replication in less than 60 minutes, or even in 15 minutes. I understand that they are working to lower replication times to 1 minute or less.”

VMware vSAN

Raymund R., a network and system administrator, values VMware vSAN’s minimal downtime:

“The minimal downtime alone is a winning blow for both the management and the ITs. Unexpected downtime is inevitable. It’s been part any organization. Addressing that pitfall really gives an edge from a business perspective.”

Harri W. ICT network administrator at a maritime company, praised vSAN’s scalability and upgrade capabilities:

“Scalability and future upgrades are a piece of cake. If you want more IOPs, then add disk groups and/or nodes on the fly. If you want to upgrade the hardware, then add new servers and retire the old ones. No service breaks at all.”

However, Javier G., engagement cloud solution architect at a communications service provider, would like to see improved hardware support with vSAN:

“The list of hardware supported should be increased in the future. I would improve these areas by increasing the number of partners to support as many partners as possible.”

Similarly, Pushkaraj D., senior manager of IT infrastructure at a tech services company, discussed the need for improved hardware compatibility:

“The vSAN Hardware Compatibility List Checker needs to improve, since currently it is a sore point for vSAN. …You need to thoroughly check and re-check the HCL with multiple vendors like VMware, in the first instance, and manufacturers like Dell, IBM, HPE, etc., as the compatibility list is very narrow.”

 



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Hyperconverged Infrastructure: What Do Users Think?


Hyperconvergence burst onto the IT scene a few years ago and remains one of the hottest trends in IT today. Vendors promise greater efficiency and agility with hyperconverged infrastructure. But what do IT pros who use the technology have to say?

Members of IT Central Station, a community of more than 250,000 IT pros who contribute enterprise technology reviews based on their experience, provided insight into leading hyperconverged infrastructure products. They cited features they love in HPE SimpliVity, Nutanix, and VMware vSAN, along with product shortcomings.

Since virtualized workloads are becoming more prevalent, IT Central Station members have found that hyperconverged infrastructure offers organizations the benefit of removing previously separate storage networks. Hyperconverged systems are flexible and can be expanded by adding nodes to the base unit.

HPE SimpliVity

Charlene H., senior systems administrator at a healthcare company, described her positive experience with HPE SimpliVity:  

“The ease of managing this system! Recently added the All Flash CN3400F and oh my goodness, are these nodes fast as lighting! I love having a private cloud for my organization. Public cloud will never care for my organization’s data more than I do.”

Tommy H., senior systems/storage engineer at Banc of California, described the value that HPE SimpliVity’s backup capabilities have added to his organization:

“Backups are all automatic and admins do not have to worry if the production VMs are being backed up. Easy backup policy with no LUN administration is also one less task to worry about. DR and DR replication are no longer an issue; no longer have to seed a SAN locally and ship it out to the DR site.”

However, a senior cloud data architect who uses HPE SimpliVity said improvements could be made to both its data storage and data replication capabilities:

“I would like to see replication to a cloud solution. I would like to replicate the data so that we have a backup copy off-site. I could then be comfortable getting rid of our existing backup solution….The other feature would be a single copy of the data storage as opposed to a dual copy. In that way, when I do things that automatically have dual copies, such as with our SQL server databases, I would not then be making four copies of the data.”

A senior systems administrator at a consultancy company would like to see other improvements:

“There are some maintenance features (replica copy load-balancing) that could stand to be automated and/or streamlined for customer execution.…Also, the ability to scale compute and storage independently of one another would be a way to add value to the entire product line.”

Nutanix

A cyber security engineer at a technology services company explained why he likes Nutanix:

“Hyperconvergence is the most valuable feature for me, as it allows me to scale the hardware accordingly to project requirements…It is now our single most powerful server that is easily scalable and has an HTML5 site that manages all aspects of the system.”

An enterprise systems and IT architect at a technology services company described the improvements that Nutanix has brought to his organization:

“There was a 30% reduction in CAPEX spending when we moved towards the Nutanix platform and we had a high ROI.”

A systems engineer at a university cited room for improvement:  

“The improvement needed is for elastic clusters, meaning the ability to depart and join nodes in an automatic way. We have a laboratory that needs to perform bare metal tests and therefore needs to unjoin the nodes from the cluster and later on join them back.”

Leandro L., system architect at a technology services company, suggested that Nutanix improve its asynchronous replication capabilities:

“I would like to see asynchronous replication in less than 60 minutes, or even in 15 minutes. I understand that they are working to lower replication times to 1 minute or less.”

VMware vSAN

Raymund R., a network and system administrator, values VMware vSAN’s minimal downtime:

“The minimal downtime alone is a winning blow for both the management and the ITs. Unexpected downtime is inevitable. It’s been part any organization. Addressing that pitfall really gives an edge from a business perspective.”

Harri W. ICT network administrator at a maritime company, praised vSAN’s scalability and upgrade capabilities:

“Scalability and future upgrades are a piece of cake. If you want more IOPs, then add disk groups and/or nodes on the fly. If you want to upgrade the hardware, then add new servers and retire the old ones. No service breaks at all.”

However, Javier G., engagement cloud solution architect at a communications service provider, would like to see improved hardware support with vSAN:

“The list of hardware supported should be increased in the future. I would improve these areas by increasing the number of partners to support as many partners as possible.”

Similarly, Pushkaraj D., senior manager of IT infrastructure at a tech services company, discussed the need for improved hardware compatibility:

“The vSAN Hardware Compatibility List Checker needs to improve, since currently it is a sore point for vSAN. …You need to thoroughly check and re-check the HCL with multiple vendors like VMware, in the first instance, and manufacturers like Dell, IBM, HPE, etc., as the compatibility list is very narrow.”

 



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