Tag Archives: Tool

Google Open Sources Tool For Pivacy





Google is open-sourcing a library that it uses to glean insights from aggregate data in a privacy-preserving manner. Called Differentially Private SQL, the library leverages the idea of differential privacy (DP) — a statistical technique that makes it possible to collect and share aggregate information about users, while safeguarding individual privacy. This allows developers and organizations to build tools that can learn from aggregate user data without revealing any personally identifiable information. (Source: The Next Web)




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Swapnil Bhartiya has decades of experience covering emerging technologies and enterprise open source. His stories have appeared in a multitude of leading publications including CIO, InfoWorld, Network World, The New Stack, Linux Pro Magazine, ADMIN Magazine, HPE Insights, Raspberry Pi Geek Magazine, SweetCode, Linux For You, Electronics For You and more. He is also a science fiction writer and founder of TFiR.io.

GNOME Wants to Make Linux Firmware Updates Easier to Deploy with New Tool





Long-time GNOME developer Richard Hughes is looking at a new tool for the GNOME desktop environment to make deployments of firmware updates easier for all users. At the moment, the GNOME Software Center only displays devices when firmware updates are pending, but Hughes and Andrew Schwenn, an intern from Dell, have been working lately on a new tool that would be integrated as a panel into GNOME Control Center, which promises to make it easier for users to install new firmware versions for their hardware. (Source: Softpedia)




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Swapnil Bhartiya has decades of experience covering emerging technologies and enterprise open source. His stories have appeared in a multitude of leading publications including CIO, InfoWorld, Network World, The New Stack, Linux Pro Magazine, ADMIN Magazine, HPE Insights, Raspberry Pi Geek Magazine, SweetCode, Linux For You, Electronics For You and more. He is also a science fiction writer and founder of TFiR.io.

Networking Tool Comics! | Linux.com


I LOVE computer networking (it’s what I spent a big chunk of the last few years at work doing), but getting started with all the tools was originally a little tricky! For example – what if you have the IP address of a server and you want to make a https connection to it and check that it has a valid certificate? But you haven’t changed DNS to resolve to that server yet (because you don’t know if it works!) so you need to use the IP address? If you do curl https://1.2.3.4/, curl will tell you that the certificate isn’t valid (because it’s not valid for 1.2.3.4). So you need to know to do curl https://jvns.ca --resolve jvns.ca:443:104.198.14.52.

I know how to use curl --resolve because my coworker told me how. And I learned that to find out when a cert expires you can do openssl x509 -in YOURCERT.pem -text -noout the same way. So the goal with this zine is basically to be “your very helpful coworker who gives you tips about how to use networking tools” in case you don’t have that person.

Read more at Julia Evans

Schedule One-Time Commands with the Unix at Tool | Linux.com


Cron is nice and all, but don’t forget about its cousin at.

…even though I’ve been using Linux for 20 years, I still learn about new (to me) command-line tools all the time. In this “Back to Basics” article series, I plan to cover some of the command-line tools that those new to Linux may never have used before. For those of you who are more advanced, I’ll spread out this series, so you can expect future articles to be more technical. In this article, I describe how to use the at utility to schedule jobs to run at a later date.

at vs. Cron

at is one of those commands that isn’t discussed very much. When people talk about scheduling commands, typically cron gets the most coverage. Cron allows you to schedule commands to be run on a periodic basis. With cron, you can run a command as frequently as every minute or as seldom as once a day, week, month or even year. You also can define more sophisticated rules, so commands run, for example, every five minutes, every weekday, every other hour and many other combinations. System administrators sometimes will use cron to schedule a local script to collect metrics every minute or to schedule backups.

Read more at Linux Journal