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Microsoft’s Edge Goes With the Chromium Flow | Developers


By Jack M. Germain

Apr 10, 2019 5:00 AM PT

Microsoft on Monday released the first Dev and Canary channel builds of the next version of Microsoft Edge, which is based on the Chromium open source project.

The company last year revealed that it was reworking its Edge browser to be based on Chromium. Now the latest developments are ready for early testers and adopters on several versions of Windows and macOS. So far, however, no support is available for Linux.

The new Microsoft Edge builds are available through preview channels called “Microsoft Edge Insider Channels.” The first two Microsoft Edge Insider Channels,
Canary and
Dev, are available for all supported versions of Windows 10, with more platforms coming soon.

Microsoft will update the Canary channel daily and the Dev channel weekly. You can install the new Edge builds from multiple channels side-by-side for testing. Each has its own separate icon and name.

Microsoft uses the Canary channel to validate bug fixes and test brand new features. The Canary channel offers the bleeding-edge, newest builds. The Dev channel build has undergone slightly more testing but is still relatively fresh.

The Dev channel offers the best build of the week from the Canary channel based on user feedback, automated test results, performance metrics and telemetry. It provides the latest development version of Microsoft Edge as a daily driver.

The company later will introduce Beta and Stable channels to provide significantly more stable releases. Those more developed releases will give Enterprises and IT Pros lead time to start piloting the next version of Microsoft Edge.

Microsoft will not change the existing installed version of Microsoft Edge yet. It will continue to work side by side with the builds from any of the Microsoft Edge Insider Channels.

The browser upgrade is not likely to draw more users to the retooled Edge browser than dedicated Microsoft customers, suggested Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

“That is especially true since Microsoft is disabling many of the functions integrated with Google apps and tools,” he told LinuxInsider.

Logical Next Step

Microsoft’s decision to adopt the Chromium open source project in the development of its new Edge browser on the desktop is a logical step in the company’s efforts to become more embedded with open source technology. The Edge browser has been struggling.

The new development road map is based on a microservices/componentized approach, according to the company. Microsoft’s goal is to create better Web compatibility for its customers. It also aims to reduce fragmentation of the Web for all Web developers.

Rebuilding the Edge browser around Chromium reinforces Microsoft’s commitment to open source. Its software engineers have started making contributions back to Chromium in areas involving accessibility, touch and ARM64.

The company plans to continue working within the existing Chromium project rather than creating a parallel project. The Microsoft team is working directly with the teams at Google.

It’s not likely that Microsoft’s increased involvement with open source will give the company any competitive edge, King observed.

“I expect them to function much as any contributor. It’s less of an issue today than it would be if Steve Ballmer were still Microsoft’s CEO,” he said.

Other Good Options Lacking

Microsoft was faced with one of those “if you can’t beat them, join them” situations, according to King. That might have figured into the Chromium decision.

“As a technology comes to dominate online functions and interactions, developers focus on optimizing sites and apps for it. To ensure that customers have optimum online experiences, vendors adopt those dominant technologies,” he pointed out.

That is the current situation with Chromium. Ironically enough, Microsoft once was in a similar situation with its Internet Explorer technology, King recalled.

Rebuilding the Edge browser on Chromium is a great move on Microsoft’s part, said Cody Swann, CEO of
Gunner Technology.

“This is going to be a huge cost saver for Microsoft,” he told LinuxInsider. The company “can basically reassign or release a ton of engineers who were given to a losing effort to begin with.”

Revised Technology

The Edge browser will differ in several key areas from the existing open source Chromium project that Google initially developed. Most of the heavy-duty differences will be hidden under the hood.

On the technical underbelly, Microsoft is working on replacing its EdgeHTML rendering engine with Chromium’s Blink. Microsoft also is replacing its Chakra JavaScript engine with Chromium’s V8.

Microsoft is replacing or turning off more than 50 Chromium services in Edge. Some of these include Google-specific services like Google Now, Google Pay, Google Cloud Messaging, Chrome OS device management and Chrome Cleanup. Others involve existing Chromium functions such as ad blocking, spellcheck, speech input and Android app password sync.

In shifting from Google-based services to its own ecosystem, Microsoft is building into its new Edge browser support for MSA (Microsoft Accounts) and Azure Active Directory identities for authentication/single sign-in.

Microsoft also is integrating other Microsoft-based services, such as Bing Search; Windows Defender SmartScreen for phishing and malware protection; Microsoft Activity Feed Service for synchronizing data across Edge preview builds and across Edge on iOS and Android; and Microsoft News.

Bringing More to the Edge

Microsoft plans to build support for PlayReady DRM into its new Edge browser platform. Edge supports both PlayReady and Widevine.

Also in the works are additional services integration and single sign-on capabilities that presumably will support a widening deployment of Microsoft-based offerings.

Microsoft is planning to build in more than just cosmetic design changes to the Chromium browser, however. The intent is to avoid giving the new Edge a distinctively Chromium look and feel.

However, company officials have said the user interface will not be a priority until further along in the process.

Pros and Cons

On the plus side, users typically have better experiences with optimized tools and applications. On the negative, the situation entrusts a lot of power to individual companies, noted King.

“Sites that are not optimized for dominant tech also tend to perform relatively poorly compared to those that are. That results in a two-tier Web of sorts, which is one of the reasons Mozilla developed Firefox,” he said.

There is no downside to Microsoft switching to the Chromium platform in Swann’s view.

“Microsoft has been dying a slow death in the browser wars since Firefox was released,” he said, “and they’re basically just throwing in the towel.”


Jack M. Germain has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2003. His main areas of focus are enterprise IT, Linux and open source technologies. He has written numerous reviews of Linux distros and other open source software.
Email Jack.





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Troubleshooting Network Performance in Cloud Architectures | IT Infrastructure Advice, Discussion, Community


Troubleshooting within public or hybrid clouds can be a challenge when end users begin complaining of network and application performance problems. The loss of visibility of the underlying cloud network renders some traditional troubleshooting methods and tools ineffective. Thus, we must come up with alternative ways to regain that visibility. Let’s look at five tips on how to better troubleshoot application performance in public cloud or hybrid cloud environments.

Tip 1: Verify the application and all services are operational form end-to-end

The first step in the troubleshooting process should be to verify that the cloud provider is not having an issue on their end. Depending on whether your service uses a SaaS, PaaS or IaaS model, the verification process will change. For example, Salesforce SaaS platform has a status page where you can see if there are any incidents/outages or maintenance windows that may be impacting your users.

Also, don’t forget to check other dependent services that can also impact access or performance to cloud services. Services such as DHCP and internal/external DNS are common dependencies can cause problems — making it look like there is something wrong with the network. Depending on where the end user connects from in relation to the cloud application they are trying to access, the DHCP and DNS servers used will vary greatly. Verifying end users are receiving proper IP’s and can resolve domains properly can save a great deal of time and headaches.

Tip 2: Review recent network configuration changes

If a performance problem to a cloud app seemingly crops up out of nowhere, it’s likely a recent network change is to blame. On the corporate LAN, review any firewall, NAT or VLAN adds/changes didn’t inadvertently cause an outage for a portion of your users. These same types of network changes should also be verified within IaaS clouds as well.

QoS or other traffic shaping changes can also accidentally degrade performance between the corporate LAN and remote cloud services. Automated tools can be used to verify that applications are being properly marked — and those markings are being adhered to on a hop-by-hop basis between the end user and as far out to the cloud application or service as possible.

Tip 3: Use traditional network monitoring and troubleshooting tools

Depending on the cloud architecture model you’re using, traditional network troubleshooting tools can be greater or less effective when troubleshooting performance degradation. For instance, if you use IaaS such as AWS EC2 or Microsoft Azure, you have enough visibility to use most network troubleshooting and support tools such as ping, traceroute, and SNMP. You can even get NetFlow/IPFIX data streamed to a collector — or even run packet captures in a limited fashion. However, when troubleshooting PaaS or SaaS cloud models, these tools become far less useful. Thus, you end up having to trust your service provider that everything is operating as it should on their end.

Tip 4: Use built-in application diagnostics and assessment tools

Many enterprise applications have built-in or supplemental diagnostic tools that IT departments can use for troubleshooting purposes. These tools often provide detailed information that help you determine whether performance is an application-related issue — or a problem with the network or infrastructure. For example, if you’re having issues with Microsoft Teams through Office 365, you can test and verify sufficient end-to-end network performance using their Skype for Business Network Assessment Tool. Although this tool is most commonly used to verify whether Teams is a viable option pre-deployment. It can also be used post-deployment for troubleshooting purposes.

Tip 5: Consider SD-WAN built-in analytics or pure-play network analytics tools

Network analytics tools and platforms are the latest way for administrators to troubleshoot network and application performance problems. Network analytics platforms collect streaming telemetry and network health information using several methods and protocols. All data is then combined and analyzed using artificial intelligence (AI). The results of the analysis help pinpoint areas on the corporate network or cloud where network performance problems are occurring.

If you have extended your SD-WAN architecture to the public cloud, you can leverage the myriad of analytics components that are commonly included in these platforms. Alternatively, there are a growing number of pure-play vendors that sell multi-vendor network analytics tools that can be deployed across entire corporate LANs and into public clouds. While these two methods can be expensive and more complicated to deploy initially, they have shown to speed up performance troubleshooting and root cause analysis processes dramatically.



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Stadia, Web Browsers, GNOME 3.32 & Jetson Nano Dominated Linux Interest In March


PHORONIX --

During March on Phoronix was 299 original news articles and 22 featured Linux hardware reviews / benchmark specials in quite an exciting month, though looking ahead to April and Q2’2019 should be quite exciting as well.

The past month on Phoronix brought news of Google’s new “Stadia” Linux+Vulkan game streaming service, GNOME 3.32’s release with many performance improvements and fixes, the launch of the interesting $99 NVIDIA Jetson Nano, several browser benchmark articles with the Phoronix Test Suite now supporting the automated execution of browser-based tests, Linux 5.0 being released and Linux 5.1 kicking off, and much more.

If you enjoy the new Phoronix content each and every day, I kindly ask that you refrain from using any ad-blocker while enjoying material on this site or consider going premium to enjoy this site ad-free and multi-page articles on a single page among other benefits. PayPal tips are also happily accepted and you can also share our content on the likes of Facebook and Twitter.

The most popular news for March included:

A Quick Look At The Firefox 66.0 vs. Chrome 73.0 Performance Benchmarks
Given the recent releases of Chrome 73 and Firefox 66, here are some fresh tests of these latest browsers on Linux under a variety of popular browser benchmarks.

ReactOS 0.4.11 “Open-Source Windows” Available With Big Kernel Improvements
ReactOS 0.4.11 is now available as the newest version of this open-source operating system re-implementing the Windows APIs with a focus on binary driver/application compatibility. With this being the first release since November’s ReactOS 0.4.10, there are a fair amount of changes to find in this new build.

AFS For Linux 5.1 Would Have Pleased Firefox/SQLite But Was Rejected As Untested Crap
The Andrew File-System (AFS) continues to evolve as a distributed file-system. Over the past year and a half there’s been a lot of activity to AFS in the mainline Linux kernel, including material slated for the in-development Linux 5.1 kernel but then Linus Torvalds ended up having to un-pull the changes.

A Look At The Many Improvements & New Features In GNOME 3.32
Barring any last minute delays, GNOME 3.32 is expected to ship today as the latest six-month update to this popular open-source desktop environment. GNOME 3.32 personally has me quite excited more so for the improvements — and bug fixes — over “new” features, but here is a look at some of what there is to get excited about with this latest update to the GNOME 3 desktop.

A DRM-Based Linux Oops Viewer Is Being Proposed Again – Similar To Blue Screen of Death
Back when kernel mode-setting (KMS) was originally talked about a decade ago one of the talked about possibilities of implementing a Linux “Blue Screen of Death” / better error handling when a dramatic system problem occurs. Such an implementation never really materialized but now in 2019 there is a developer pursuing new work in this area with a DRM-based kernel oops viewer.

Intel CPUs Reportedly Vulnerable To New “SPOILER” Speculative Attack
SPOILER is the newest speculative attack affecting Intel’s micro-architecture.

Orbital: A PlayStation 4 Emulator That Is Emulating The PS4’s AMD GPU Using Vulkan
Orbital is an open-source project providing a virtualization-based PlayStation 4 emulator that is still in its early stages but what interests us is its technical details including the use of Vulkan/SPIR-V.

The Faster & More Beautiful GNOME 3.32 Has Been Released
GNOME 3.32, which is codenamed “Taipei” given the location of GNOME.Asia Summit 2018, has been officially released on time.

Linux 5.1 Continues The Years-Long Effort Preparing For Year 2038
Linux 5.1 continues the massive undertaking in preparing the kernel for the Year 2038 problem.

Stadia Is Google’s Cloud Gaming Service Using Linux, Vulkan & A Custom AMD GPU
Google used the annual Game Developers Conference (GDC 2019) to officially unveil “Stadia” as their cloud-based game streaming service formerly known as Project Stream.

And the most popular featured articles:

The Fastest Linux Distributions For Web Browsing – Firefox + Chrome Benchmarks On Eight Distros
With now having WebDriver/Seleneium integration in PTS for carrying out browser benchmarks, we’ve been having fun running a variety of web browser benchmarks in different configurations. The latest is looking at the Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome web browser performance across eight Linux distribution releases (or nine if counting Fedora Workstation on both X.Org and Wayland) for looking at how the web browsing performance compares.

Ubuntu 19.04 Is Offering Some Performance Improvements Over Ubuntu 18.10, Comparison To Clear Linux
With the Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” release less than one month away, we are getting ready for rolling out more tests of this next six-month installment to Ubuntu Linux. For those curious about the direction of Ubuntu 19.04’s performance, here are some very preliminary data points using the latest daily state of Ubuntu 19.04 right ahead of the beta period. Tests were done on a high-end Intel Core i9 9900K desktop as well as a Dell XPS Developer Edition notebook when comparing Ubuntu 19.04 to Ubuntu 18.10 and also tossing in Clear Linux as a performance reference point.

Benchmarking A 10-Core Tyan/IBM POWER Server For ~$300 USD
If you live in the EU and have been wanting to explore IBM POWER hardware on Linux, a load of Tyan Habanero servers recently became available through a German retailer for 269 EUR (~$306 USD) that comes equipped with a 10-core POWER8 processor. While not POWER9, it’s still an interesting Linux-capable beast and the price is unbeatable if you have been wanting to add POWER hardware to your collection. Phoronix reader Lauri Kasanen recently bought one of these IBM POWER servers at the 269 EUR price point and has shared thoughts on this server as well as some benchmarks. Here is Lauri’s guest post checking out this low-cost 2U IBM server.

NVIDIA Jetson Nano: A Feature-Packed Arm Developer Kit For $99 USD
One of the most interesting announcements out of NVIDIA’s 2019 GTC conference is the introduction of the Jetson Nano, NVIDIA’s latest Arm developer board featuring a Tegra SoC. This developer board is very different from the past Jetson boards in that it’s aiming for a very affordable price point: just $99 USD.

The 2019 Laptop Performance Cost To Linux Full-Disk Encryption
I certainly recommend that everyone uses full-disk encryption for their production systems, especially for laptops you may be bringing with you. In over a decade of using Linux full-disk encryption on my main systems, the overhead cost to doing so has fortunately improved with time thanks to new CPU instruction set extensions, optimizations within the Linux kernel, and faster SSD storage making the performance penalty even less noticeable. As it’s been a while since my last look at the Linux storage encryption overhead, here are some fresh results using a Dell XPS laptop running Ubuntu with/without LUKS full-disk encryption.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Linux Benchmarks
Last week NVIDIA announced the GeForce GTX 1660 as the newest RTX-less Turing GPU but costing only $219+ USD. The GTX 1660 is a further trimmed down version of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti that launched several weeks prior. After picking up an ASUS GeForce GTX 1660 Phoenix Edition, here are Linux OpenGL/Vulkan gaming benchmarks compared to a wide assortment of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards under Ubuntu.

AMDGPU vs. Radeon Kernel Driver Performance On Linux 5.0 For AMD GCN 1.0/1.1 GPUs
A seldom advertised experimental feature of the AMDGPU kernel driver has long been the GCN 1.0/1.1 graphics support. By default these Southern Islands and Sea Islands graphics processors default to the Radeon DRM driver, but with some kernel command lime parameters can use the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver. The AMDGPU code path is better maintained since it’s used for all modern Radeon GPUs, using AMDGPU opens up Vulkan driver support, and possible performance benefits. It’s a while since last testing the Radeon vs. AMDGPU driver performance for these original GCN graphics cards, so here are some fresh benchmarks using the Linux 5.0 kernel and Mesa 19.1-devel.

Linux 4.19 Kernel Benchmarks On The Raspberry Pi
With the Raspberry Pi Foundation recently having begun rolling out a Linux 4.19-based kernel to Raspberry Pi boards, here are some benchmarks looking at the performance of two Raspberry Pi systems with the new Linux 4.19 kernel compared to its previous 4.14 kernel.

The Current Spectre / Meltdown Mitigation Overhead Benchmarks On Linux 5.0
With it being a little over one year since Spectre and Meltdown mitigations became public and with the Linux kernel today hitting the big “5.0” release, I decided to run some benchmarks of the current out-of-the-box performance hit as a result of the current default mitigation techniques employed by the Linux kernel. The default vs. unmitigated performance impact for Spectre/Meltdown are tested on an Intel Core i7 and Core i9 systems while there is also an AMD Ryzen 7 box for reference with its Spectre mitigation impact on Linux 5.0.

Intel P-State vs. CPUFreq Frequency Scaling Performance On The Linux 5.0 Kernel
It’s been a while since last running any P-State/CPUFreq frequency scaling driver and governor comparisons on Intel desktop systems, so given the recent release of Linux 5.0 I ran some tests for looking at the current state of affairs. Using an Intel Core i9 9900K I tested both the P-State and CPUFreq scaling drivers and their prominent governor options for seeing not only how the raw performance compares but also the system power consumption, CPU thermals, and performance-per-Watt.




Five Steps to Address Cloud Security Challenges | IT Infrastructure Advice, Discussion, Community


Today’s interconnected world relies on data accessibility from anywhere, at any time, on any device. The speed and agility that comes with hosting services and applications in the cloud are central to modern interconnected success. As such, these inherent benefits have compelled organizations to migrate some or all of their applications or infrastructures to the cloud. In fact, some industry experts estimate that up to 83 percent of enterprise workloads will migrate to the cloud by 2020.

While the cloud may offer significant benefits, organizations need to be aware of the security challenges when planning a cloud-first strategy. Some of those challenges involve not only protection and compliance but also operational considerations, such as the ability to integrate security solutions for on-premise and cloud workloads; to enforce consistent security policies across the hybrid cloud and to automate virtual machine (VM) discovery to ensure visibility and control over dynamic infrastructure.

1: Balance protection and compliance

Striking a balance between protection and compliance is a huge challenge. Sometimes, it’s all about discouraging threat actors by making them invest more time, energy, and resources than they first estimated into breaching the organization. Making attackers go through several layers of defenses means they could slip up at some point and trigger an alert before reaching the organization’s crown jewels.

Recent data breaches should push leaders into thinking beyond compliance. Besides risking more fines, they risk their reputation as well. Compliance regulations tend to be addressed as base-minimum security options. However, thorough protection involves deploying multiple security layers designed to both help IT and security teams streamline operations, as well as increase visibility and accelerate detection of threats before a full-blown breach occurs.

2: Integrate security solutions for on-premise and cloud workloads

Finding the right security solution to seamlessly integrate with both on-premise and cloud workloads without impacting consolidation ratios, affecting performance or creating manageability issues is also a challenge. Traditional security solutions can, at best, offer separate solutions for on-premise and cloud workloads; however, still run the risk of creating visibility and management issues. At worst, the same traditional security solution is deployed on all workloads – cloud and local – creating serious performance issues for the latter. It’s important for organizations to integrate a security solution that’s built for automatically molding its security agent to the job at hand, based on whether the workload is on-premises or in the cloud, without impacting performance or compromising on security capabilities.

3: Deploy consistent security policies across the hybrid cloud

To address this challenge, organizations need to find security solutions that can adapt security agents to the type of environment they are deployed in. Cloud environments solutions must be agile enough to leverage all the benefits of cloud without sacrificing security, while for traditional on-premise environments, versatile enough to enable productivity and mobility. Organizations must understand that deploying security policies across hybrid infrastructures can be troublesome, especially without a centralized security console that can seamlessly relay those policies across all endpoints and workloads. It’s important to automatically apply group security policies to newly spawned virtual machines, based on their role within the infrastructure. For instance, newly spawned virtual servers should immediately adhere to group-specific policies, as well as newly spawned VDIs the same, and so on. Otherwise, the consequences could be disastrous, in the sense that they would be left unprotected against threats and attackers for as long as they’re operational.

4: Automate VM discovery

Automated VM discovery is the whole point of an integrated security platform, as security policies can automatically be applied based on the type of machine.

Organizations should consider adopting security solutions that can automate VM discovery and apply security policies accordingly, without forcing IT and security teams to push policies to newly instanced workloads manually.

Considering the hybrid cloud’s flexibility in terms of endpoints (physical and virtual) and infrastructure (on-premise and in the cloud), it’s important that the security solution embraces the same elasticity and enable organizations to fully embrace the benefits of these infrastructures without sacrificing performance, usability or security.

5: Maintain visibility and control over dynamic infrastructure

In the context of adopting a mobility- and cloud-first approach, it has become increasingly difficult for IT and security teams to view an organization’s security posture, especially since traditional security solutions don’t offer single-pane-of-glass visibility across all endpoints.

Integrating a complete security platform can help IT and security teams save time while offering security automation features that help speed up the ability to identify signs of a data breach accurately.

Addressing cloud security challenges is constant, ongoing work that requires IT and security teams to be vigilant while at the same time adopting the right security and automation tools to help take some of the operational burden off their shoulders. Working together to find the right solutions ensures both teams get what they need. The collaboration of these two focused teams ensures the entire infrastructure is protected, regardless of on-premise or cloud workloads.



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Telegram Provides Nuclear Option to Erase Sent Messages | Developers


By Jack M. Germain

Mar 26, 2019 5:00 AM PT

Telegram Messaging on Sunday announced a new privacy rights feature that allows user to delete not only their own comments, but also those of all other participants in the message thread on all devices that received the conversation. Although the move is meant to bolster privacy, it’s likely to spark some controversy.

Telegram Provides Nuclear Option to Erase Sent Messages

Telegram, a cloud-based instant messaging and Voice over IP service, is similar to WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger. Telegram Messenger allows users to send free messages by using a WiFi connection or mobile data allowance with optional end-to-end encryption and encrypted local storage for Secret Chats.

Telegram’s new unsend feature does two things. First, it removes the previous 48-hour time limit for removing anything a user wrote from the devices of participants. Second, it lets users delete entire chats from the devices of all participating parties.



Unsend Anything screenshot

– click image to play video –


Telegram also changed a policy regarding how users can or can not forward another’s conversation.

Privacy policies are critical to people who rely heavily on chat communications, noted Paul Bischoff, privacy advocate with
Comparitech.

“Many people use chat apps under the assumption that their communications are private, so it is very important that chat apps meet those expectations of privacy,” he told LinuxInsider.

Obviously, if you’re a dissident in an autocratic country that cracks down on free speech, privacy is very important. However, it is also important to everyday people, said Bischoff, for “sending photos of their kids, organizing meetings, and exchanging Netflix passwords,” for example.

Potential Controversy

Telegram’s new unsend feature could stir controversy over the rights of parties to a message conversation. One user’s right to carry out a privacy purge could impact other participants’ rights to engage in discourse.

Regardless of who initiated the chat, any participant can delete some or all of the conversation. Criticisms voiced since the change in the company’s unsend policy suggest that the first participant to unsend effectively can remove control from everyone else. Telegram’s process allows deletion of messages in their entirety — not just the senders’ comments.

The chat history suddenly disappears. No notification indicates the message thread was deleted.

Privacy Treatments

Telegram Messenger, like its competitors, has had an “unsend” feature for the last two years. It allowed users to delete any messages they sent via the app within a 48-hour time limit. However, users could not delete conversations they did not send.

Facebook’s unsend feature differs in that it gives users the ability to recall a sent message — but only within 10 minutes of sending it.

“Telegram doesn’t enable end-to-end encryption by default, but you can get it by using the “Secret Chats” feature,” said Comparitech’s Bischoff.

End-to-end encryption ensures that no one except the intended recipient — not even Telegram — can decrypt messages, he said. WhatsApp and Signal encrypt messages by default.

Telegram has an incredibly strong brand, according to Jamie Cambell, founder of
Go Best VPN. It has a reputation for being the app of the people, since it’s been banned from Russia for not providing the encryption keys to the government.

“Its founder, Pavel Durov, actively seeks to fight censorship and is widely considered the Mark Zuckerberg of Russia,” he told LinuxInsider.

Why the Change?

The new unsend feature gives millions of users complete control of any private conversation they have ever had, according to Telegram. Users can choose to delete any message they sent or received from both sides in any private chat.

“The messages will disappear for both you and the other person — without leaving a trace,” noted the Telegram Team in an online post.

The change was orchestrated “to improve the privacy of the Telegram messaging application,” the post continues. “Its developers upgraded the Unsend feature “to allow users to remotely delete private chat sessions from all devices involved.”

The privacy changes are to protect users, according to the company. Old forgotten messages might be taken out of context and used against them decades later.

For example, a hasty text sent to a girlfriend in school can return to haunt the sender years later “when you decide to run for mayor,” the company suggested.

How It Works

Telegram users can delete any private chat entirely from both their device and the other person’s device with just two taps.

To delete a message from both ends, a user taps on the message and selects the delete button. A message windows then asks the user to select whether to delete just his/her chat messages or those of the other participants as well.

Telegram’s new feature lets users delete messages in one-to-one or group private chats. Selecting the second choice deletes the message everywhere. Selecting the first choice only removes it from the inbox of the user initiating the delete request.

The privacy purge allows users to delete all traces of the conversation, even if the user did not send the original message or begin the thread.

Forwarding Controls Added

Telegram also added an Anonymous Forwarding feature to make privacy more complete. This feature gives users new controls to restrict who can forward their messages, according to Telegram.

When users enable the Anonymous Forwarding setting, their forwarded messages no longer will link back to their account. Instead, the message window will only display an unclickable name in the “from” field.

“This way people you chat with will have no verifiable proof you ever sent them anything,” according to Telegram’s announcement.

Telegram also introduced new message controls in the app’s Privacy and Security settings. A new feature called “Forwarded messages” lets users restrict who can view their profile photos and prevent any forwarded messages from being traced back to their account.

Open Source Prospects

The Telegram application programming interface
is 100 percent open for all developers who want to build applications on the Telegram platform, according to the company.

“Open APIs allow third-party developers to create applications that integrate with Telegram and extend its capabilities,” Bischoff said.

Telegram may be venturing further into open source terrain. The company might release all of the messaging app’s code at some point, suggests a note on its website’s FAQ page. That could bode well for privacy rights enthusiasts.

“Releasing more of the code will have a positive effect on Telegram’s appeal, barring any unforeseen security issues. That allows security auditors to crack open the code to see if Telegram is doing anything unsafe or malicious,” Bischoff added.

Win-Win Proposition

Telegram’s new take on protecting users’ privacy rights is a positive step forward, said attorney David Reischer, CEO of
LegalAdvice.com. It benefits both customers who want more control over how their data and communications are shared and privacy rights advocates who see privacy as an important cornerstone of society.

It is not uncommon for a person to send a message and then later regret it. There also can be legal reasons for a person to want to delete all copies of a previously sent message.

For example, “a person may send a message and then realize, even many months later, that the communication contained confidential information that should not be shared or entered into the public domain,” Reischer told LinuxInsider.

Allowing a person to prevent the communication from being forwarded is also an important advance for consumers who value their privacy, he added. It allows a user to prevent sharing of important confidential communications.

“Privacy rights advocates, such as myself, see these technology features as extremely important because the right to privacy entails that one’s personal communications should have a high standard of protection from public scrutiny,” Reischer said.

Still, there exists a negative effect when private conversations are breached through malicious actors who find an unlawful way to circumvent the privacy features, he cautioned. Ultimately, the trust and confidence on the part of senders could be misplaced if communications turn out to be not-so-private after all.

Privacy Concerns First Priority

Privacy is extremely important to those who use chat communications — at least those who are somewhat tech-savvy, noted Cambell. For Telegram, privacy is the most important feature for users.

Privacy is extremely important to many Americans who want to have private conversations even when the communications are just ordinary in nature, said Reischer. Many people like to know that their thoughts and ideas are to be read only by the intended recipient.

“A conversation taken out of context may appear damnable to others even when the original intent of the message was innocuous,” he said.

Additionally, many professionals of various trades and crafts may not want to share their confidential trade secrets and proprietary information, Reischer added. “Privacy is important to all business people, and there is typically an expectation of privacy in business when communicating with other coworkers, management, legal experts or external third parties.”

Other New Features

Telegram added new features that made the app more efficient to use. For example, the company added a search tool that allows users to find settings quickly. It also shows answers to any Telegram-related questions based on the FAQ.

The company also upgraded GIF and stickers search and appearance on all mobile platforms. Any GIF can be previewed by tapping and holding.

Sticker packs now have icons, which makes selecting the right pack easier. Large GIFs and video messages on Telegram are now streamed. This lets users start watching them without waiting for the download to complete.

VoiceOver and TalkBack support for accessibility features now support gesture-based technologies to give spoken feedback that makes it possible to use Telegram without seeing the screen.


Jack M. Germain has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2003. His main areas of focus are enterprise IT, Linux and open source technologies. He has written numerous reviews of Linux distros and other open source software.
Email Jack.





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