Tag Archives: Magazine

Linus Torvalds Welcomes 2019 with Linux 5.x » Linux Magazine


Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux 5.0-rc1. The kernel was supposed to be 4.21, but he decided to move to the 5.x series. Torvalds has made it clear that the numbering of the kernel doesn’t make much sense. So don’t get too excited about this release.

Torvalds explained in the LKML (Linux Kernel Mailing List), “The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you want to have an official reason, it’s that I ran out of fingers and numerology this time (we’re _about_ 6.5M objects in the git repo), and there isn’t any major particular feature that made for the release numbering either,” he said.

The release brings CPU and GPU improvements. In addition to support for AMD’s FreeSync display, it also comes with support for Raspberry Pi Touchscreen.

Talking about the ‘content’ of the kernel Torvalds wrote, “The stats look fairly normal. About 50% is drivers, 20% is architecture updates, 10% is tooling, and the remaining 20% is all over (documentation, networking, filesystems, header file updates, core kernel code..).”



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GitHub Offers Free Private Repositories » Linux Magazine


GitHub has announced that it is now taking on players like GitLabs and offering free private repositories. Anyone could always set-up free repository on GitHub; the condition was that the code had to be public, which meant that projects and organizations could not set up private repositories. If they want private repository, they had to pay.

Now anyone can create a private repository for free. The only caveat is that there can be at most three collaborators to the project, which means big organizations can’t exploit the free service to manage their mega projects.

A private repository lets developers communities work on the code base internally, away from public. GitHub competitors like GitLab already offer free private repository.



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Microsoft Gets an Open Source Web Browser » Linux Magazine


The “new” Microsoft under Satya Nadella is now going deeper with Open Source. The company is dropping its own technologies that power its Edge web browser, which replaced Internet Explore. But instead of reinventing the wheel and creating their browser from scratch, Microsoft will use Google’s Open Source Chromium browser as the base of its web browser.

Microsoft will cease to use the EdgeHTML rendering engine for its Chromium-based web browser and will use Google’s Blink rendering engine.

“We will move to a Chromium-compatible web platform for Microsoft Edge on the desktop. Our intent is to align the Microsoft Edge web platform simultaneously (a) with web standards and (b) with other Chromium-based browsers,” said Joe Belfiore, Corporate Vice President of Windows in a blog post.“

Microsoft is also planning to bring its Chromium-based web browser to competing platforms like macOS. “We also expect this work to enable us to bring Microsoft Edge to other platforms like macOS. Improving the web-platform experience for both end users and developers requires that the web platform and the browser be consistently available to as many devices as possible,” said Belfiore.

Will, it also come to Linux? Does this also mean that one day we may see Linux-powered Windows? Time will tell.



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Canonical Launches MicroK8s » Linux Magazine


Canonical, the parent company of Ubuntu, has announced MicroK8s, a snap package of Kubernetes that supports more than 42 flavors of Linux.

MicroK8s further simplifies the deployment of Kubernetes with its small disk and memory footprint. Users can deploy Kubernetes in a few seconds. It can run on the desktop, the server, an edge cloud, or an IoT device.

Snap is a self-contained app package solution created by Canonical that competes with Flatpak, which is backed by Red Hat and Fedora. Snap offers macOS and Windows-like packages with all dependencies bundled with it. A snap package of Kubernetes means any Linux distribution that supports Snap can benefit from MicroK8s

All it takes to deploy MicroK8s is this command:

sudo snap install microk8s --classic

Canonical said in a press release the benefits of providing MicroK8s as a snap include automatic updates and well-defined security capabilities. Automatic updates ensure developers are always working from the latest upstream Kubernetes with binaries delivered directly from the source and configured in seconds.



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Microsoft Goes Open Source with Web Browsers » Linux Magazine


The “new” Microsoft under Satya Nadella is now going deeper with Open Source. The company is dropping its own technologies that power its Edge web browser, which replaced Internet Explore. But instead of reinventing the wheel and creating their browser from scratch, Microsoft will use Google’s Open Source Chromium browser as the base of its web browser.

Microsoft will cease to use the EdgeHTML rendering engine for its Chromium-based web browser and will use Google’s Blink rendering engine.

“We will move to a Chromium-compatible web platform for Microsoft Edge on the desktop. Our intent is to align the Microsoft Edge web platform simultaneously (a) with web standards and (b) with other Chromium-based browsers,” said Joe Belfiore, Corporate Vice President of Windows in a blog post, “

Microsoft is also planning to bring its Chromium-based web browser to competing platforms like macOS. “We also expect this work to enable us to bring Microsoft Edge to other platforms like macOS. Improving the web-platform experience for both end users and developers requires that the web platform and the browser be consistently available to as many devices as possible,” said Belfiore.

Will, it also come to Linux? Does this also mean that one day we may see Linux-powered Windows? Time will tell.



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