Tag Archives: Magazine

SUSE Spins off from Parent Company » Linux Magazine


SUSE has completed its move from Micro Focus to EQT, a growth investor firm. As the focus is shifting towards moving up in the stack, towards the cloud, there is a consolidation happening in the market. While Red Hat has become a unit of IBM, SUSE is heading towards becoming an independent entity.

Many would argue that post-IBM acquisition of Red Hat, SUSE has become the ‘biggest’ Linux vendor. While Linux is still the core of SUSE business, the company has built a massive portfolio of emerging technologies like cloud, containers, and IoT.

“Current IT trends make it clear that open source has become more important in the enterprise than ever before,” said SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann. “Our genuinely open, open source solutions, flexible business practices, lack of enforced vendor lock-in and exceptional service are more critical to customer and partner organizations, and our independence coincides with our single-minded focus on delivering what is best for them.”

To continue its momentum, SUSE has expanded its executive team. Enrica Angelone has become the new chief financial officer, and Sander Huyts is SUSE’s new chief operations officer. Thomas Di Giacomo, formerly chief technology officer for SUSE, is now president of Engineering, Product and Innovation.

The company believes that EQT’s backing and SUSE’s independent status will enable the company’s continued expansion as advanced innovation drives growth in SUSE’s core business as well as in emerging technologies, both organically and through add-on acquisitions.



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Gnome 3.32 Released » Linux Magazine


The Gnome community has announced the release of Gnome 3.32. The release incorporates 26438 changes (made by approximately 798 contributors) including new features improvements and performance enhancements.

Gnome users will be greeted with a refreshed visual style for the user interface and icons. Gnome 3.32 brings supports for fractional scaling feature as an experimental option, which will satisfy those users who have HiDPI monitors.

To streamline the user experience across apps, Gnome has removed the ‘application menu’ and moved its contents to a primary menu located within the application window.

While there are popular Chromium and Firefox web browsers, Gnome also offers its own web browser called Web. Gnome’s browser now comes with an automation mode, which allows users to control web applications using WebDriver. Talking about control, Gnome has improved Touchpad support. It’s not on par with macOS, but users can swipe left or right to go back or forward through browsing history.

Gnome 3.32 has improved security. The Settings tools feature a new panel called Application that offers permissions control for various applications, including installed Flatpak. Gnome Software (applications manager for Gnome) has improved handling for apps available from multiple sources, including distribution repositories and Flatpak.

Arch and Gentoo users can already test Gnome 3.32, openSUSE Tumbleweed is also expected to get the update soon.



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SUSE Inches Towards Independence » Linux Magazine


SUSE has completed its move from Micro Focus to EQT, a growth investor firm. As the focus is shifting towards moving up in the stack, towards the cloud, there is a consolidation happening in the market. While Red Hat has become a unit of IBM, SUSE is heading towards becoming an independent entity, again.

Many would argue that post-IBM acquisition of Red Hat, SUSE has become the ‘biggest’ Linux vendor. While Linux is still the core of SUSE business, the company has built a massive portfolio of emerging technologies like cloud, containers, and IoT.

“Current IT trends make it clear that open source has become more important in the enterprise than ever before,” said SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann. “Our genuinely open, open source solutions, flexible business practices, lack of enforced vendor lock-in and exceptional service are more critical to customer and partner organizations, and our independence coincides with our single-minded focus on delivering what is best for them.”

To continue its momentum, SUSE has expanded its executive team. Enrica Angelone has become the new chief financial officer, and Sander Huyts is SUSE’s new chief operations officer. Thomas Di Giacomo, formerly chief technology officer for SUSE, is now president of Engineering, Product and Innovation.

The company believes that EQT’s backing and SUSE’s independent status will enable the company’s continued expansion as advanced innovation drives growth in SUSE’s core business as well as in emerging technologies, both organically and through add-on acquisitions.



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VMware Rolls Out Essential PKS » Linux Magazine


VMware is launching a new Kubernetes solution called VMware Essential PKS. Essential PKS includes an upstream Kubernetes version backed with commercial support by VMware. The new solution is designed to address the needs of users who want vendor support without the heavy customization and modification often associated with vendor-distributed Kubernetes alternatives. Essential PKS also comes with reference architectures to inform design decisions.

Why would someone want Essential (with an upstream version of Kubernetes) rather than VMware’s own fully managed Enterprise PKS? According to Vmware VP Craig McLuckie, many potential customers have already invested in Kubernetes and would prefer to keep the open source, upstream version, but without the overhead of in-house maintenance.



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Linux 5.0 Is Here » Linux Magazine


Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel has announced the release of Linux 5.0. Despite any excitement around the major release number, the fact is these numbers really don’t mean much. Torvalds has often said that he chooses a new number when the version number becomes too long. He simply doesn’t want a situation where “the numbers are big enough that you can’t really distinguish them.”

Announcing 5.0, Torvalds wrote, “I’d like to point out (yet again) that we don’t do feature-based releases, and that “5.0” doesn’t mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.”

That said, there are many new features in this release, including support for GPUs. Linux 5.0 comes with improvement for AMD FreeSync, NVIDIA RTX Turing, and Raspberry Pi Touch Display support. It also comes with Google’s Adiantum storage encryption system.

As we reported earlier, 50% of the Linux 5.0 codebase consists of drivers update, 20 percent is architecture updates, 10 percent is tooling, and the remaining 20 percent is rest of the stuff, including documentation, networking, filesystems, header file updates, and core kernel code.

Linux 5.0 also mitigates the performance hit that was caused by previous mitigations of Spectre and Meltdown bugs.



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