Tag Archives: linux

openSUSE OBS Can Now Build Windows WSL Images » Linux Magazine


As Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) is becoming a critical piece of Microsoft’s cloud and data-center audience, openSUSE is working on technologies that help developers use distributions of their choice for WSL. Users can run the same WSL distribution that they run in the cloud or on their servers.

The core piece of openSUSE’s WSL offering is the WSL appx files, which are basically zip files that contain a tarball of a Linux system (like a container) and a Windows exe file, the so called launcher.

An openSUSE blog explains that “building a container is something SUSE’s Open Build Service (OBS) can already do fully automatic by means of Kiwi. The launcher as well as the final appx however is typically built on a Windows machine using Visual Studio by the developer.”

As a result of this work, OBS can actually build the WSL appx from sources.  Anyone can build their WSL distribution. However, since the files are signed by openSUSE and not Microsoft, you will need additional steps to run them on Windows 10 machines.



Source link

Linux Sudo bug opens root access to unauthorized users





Sudo, the main command in Linux that allows users to run tasks, has been found to have a vulnerability that allows unauthorized users to execute commands as a root user. The vulnerability, known as CVE-2019-14287, does require a nonstandard configuration but nonetheless does open the door to unauthorized users. (SiliconAngle)




Previous articleRed Hat CFO ‘Dismissed’ From Company

Swapnil Bhartiya has decades of experience covering emerging technologies and enterprise open source. His stories have appeared in a multitude of leading publications including CIO, InfoWorld, Network World, The New Stack, Linux Pro Magazine, ADMIN Magazine, HPE Insights, Raspberry Pi Geek Magazine, SweetCode, Linux For You, Electronics For You and more. He is also a science fiction writer and founder of TFiR.io.

Highly Threaded Linux Software Running Under CFS Quotas See Big Performance Fix


LINUX KERNEL --

Thanks to a Linux kernel fix that is likely to be back-ported to the various stable series, highly threaded software running under CFS quotas for enforcing CPU limits are about to be much faster. At least in a synthetic test case, the kernel fix yields a 30x improvement in performance.

Spotted by the Kubernetes community but affecting others with highly threaded workloads and making use of a CFS quota to restricted shared CPU resources, it turns out that highly-threaded applications are routinely not getting “their fair share” of the CPU, leading to lower than expected performance and higher latency.

This has been a known bug for more than one year and a kernel bug report on unexpected CFS throttling since late 2017. The issue is believed to be recently fixed up for mainline Linux 5.4 and pending for back-ports after the patch was volleyed around the kernel mailing list for a few months.

There is the fix that is a few dozen lines of code that removes the expiration of CPU-local slices:

It has been observed, that highly-threaded, non-cpu-bound applications running under cpu.cfs_quota_us constraints can hit a high percentage of periods throttled while simultaneously not consuming the allocated amount of quota. This use case is typical of user-interactive non-cpu bound applications, such as those running in kubernetes or mesos when run on multiple cpu cores.

This greatly improves performance of high-thread-count, non-cpu bound applications with low cfs_quota_us allocation on high-core-count machines. In the case of an artificial testcase (10ms/100ms of quota on 80 CPU machine), this commit resulted in almost 30x performance improvement, while still maintaining correct cpu quota restrictions.

Thanks to Phoronix reader Mark for pointing out this recent kernel change.


Red Hat CFO ‘Dismissed’ From Company





Red Hat Inc.’s finance chief Eric Shander has been dismissed from the company, forfeiting a $4 million retention award that was agreed to ahead of Red Hat’s acquisition by International Business Machines Corp. The Raleigh, N.C.-based software company confirmed late Thursday that Mr. Shander was no longer working at Red Hat. “Eric was dismissed without pay in connection with Red Hat’s workplace standards,” a company spokeswoman said in a statement. (WSJ)




Previous articleOpenSUSE’s OBS Can Now Spin Windows Subsystem for Linux Images

Swapnil Bhartiya has decades of experience covering emerging technologies and enterprise open source. His stories have appeared in a multitude of leading publications including CIO, InfoWorld, Network World, The New Stack, Linux Pro Magazine, ADMIN Magazine, HPE Insights, Raspberry Pi Geek Magazine, SweetCode, Linux For You, Electronics For You and more. He is also a science fiction writer and founder of TFiR.io.

Plasma 5.17 Beta in openSUSE Tumbleweed





The Beta version of Plasma 5.17 was released with many new features and improvements such as per-screen fractional scaling on Wayland, a new User Interface (UI) for configuring permissions of Thunderbolt devices and network statistics in KSysGuard. The latter requires some more privileges than usual for a user application, so is currently being looked at by the SUSE security team. (openSUSE Blog)