Tag Archives: HPE

HPE Snaps Up Flash Supplier Nimble Storage


Hewlett Packard Enterprise on Tuesday said it signed a deal to buy Nimble Storage, a maker of all-flash and hybrid-flash storage arrays, for $1 billion in cash.

HPE said Nimble’s predictive flash products complement its 3PAR and MSA products and advance its hybrid IT strategy. The company plans to integrate Nimble’s InfoSight Predictive Analytics platform across its storage product portfolio.

Founded in 2007, San Jose, Calif.-based Nimble has been a prominent player in the rise of flash storage in the enterprise data center. In a 2014 Network Computing blog post, storage expert Howard Marks described Nimble as successful not only with its technology, but also in selling the product. The company went public in 2013.

Krista Macomber, senior analyst at Technology Business Research, said Nimble has been one of the more successful flash storage vendors by combining innovation in flash components with its InfoSight analytics platform. Bringing analytics to the table for functions like performance monitoring “can help customers maximize their investment in flash technologies,” she told me in a phone interview.

While the cost of flash storage has come down in the past couple years, it still carries a premium, Macomber said. Being able to use analytics software to optimize flash is a valuable capability for an enterprise customer, she said.

She called HPE’s purchase of Nimble a sign of the times as the storage market moves away from traditional disk and standalone technologies and towards flash-based converged and hyperconverged models. “HPE has been very active in making acquisitions to accelerate the pace that it can evolve its portfolio towards these markets,” she said.

In January, HPE announced an agreement to buy hyperconverged startup SimpliVity for $650 million in cash.

“Nimble Storage’s portfolio complements and strengthens our current 3PAR products in the high-growth flash storage market and will help us deliver on our vision of making hybrid IT simple for our customers,”  HPE president and CEO Meg Whitman said in a prepared statement.

Rohit Kshetrapal, CEO at Nimble competitor Tegile, said in an email statement that the deal will fill the gap in its product lines created by its “aging LeftHand and MSA lines.” He also said HPE will need to draw the line between the Nimble and 3PAR products, describing them as overlapping.

The Nimble deal is expected to close in April.



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HPE Inks Deal For SimpliVity


Hewlett-Packard Enterprise on Tuesday announced an agreement to buy hyperconverged startup SimpliVity for $650 million in cash to bolster its hybrid IT strategy.

Founded in 2009, SimpliVity was an early player in the fast-growing hyperconverged infrastructure market. The startup came out of stealth in 2012 with its OmniStack platform that combines compute, storage services, and network switching. The platform, which is composed of SimpliVity’s Data Virtualization Platform software and purpose-built Accelerator Card, includes data compression, deduplication, and built-in backup.

Gartner labeled SimpliVity a leader in hyperconvergence, along with Cisco, EMC, Nutanix, and NetApp, in its Magic Quadrant for Integrated Systems last fall. In addition to offering an OmniCube appliance, SimpliVity teams with Cisco, Dell, Huawei, and Lenovo to integrate OmniStack into their servers.

“This transaction expands HPE’s software-defined capability and fits squarely within our strategy to make hybrid IT simple for customers,” Meg Whitman, HPE president and CEO, said in a statement.

 

HPE said it will continue to offer its own hyperconverged products, the HC 380 and HC 250, for existing customers and partners. The company jumped into the hyperconvergence nearly a year ago with the HC 380. SimpliVity customers and partners shouldn’t expect any immediate changes in product roadmap, according to HPE, which said it will continue to support them.

Within 60 days of the deal closing — which HPE expects in the second quarter of its fiscal year 2017 — the company plans to offer SimpliVity’s software qualified for its ProLiant DL380 servers. By the second half, it expects to offer a range of integrated HPE SimpliVity systems on ProLiant servers.

Dan Conde, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group and Interop ITX Review Board member, told me in an email that SimpliVity provides HPE with better differentiation in the hyperconverged infrastructure market. HPE’s own products aren’t built from the ground-up for hyperconvergence to the same extent as SimpliVity’s, he said.

“I think they [HPE] wanted some ‘secret sauce’,” Conde said.

Technology Business Research recently estimated that the market for hyperconverged platforms will reach $7.2 billion by 2020.

SimpliVity’s OmniCube made its way to Hollywood last year, when it was disguised as the Pied Piper box in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” television show.



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HPE Inks Deal For SimpliVity


Hewlett-Packard Enterprise on Tuesday announced an agreement to buy hyperconverged startup SimpliVity for $650 million in cash to bolster its hybrid IT strategy.

Founded in 2009, SimpliVity was an early player in the fast-growing hyperconverged infrastructure market. The startup came out of stealth in 2012 with its OmniStack platform that combines compute, storage services, and network switching. The platform, which is composed of SimpliVity’s Data Virtualization Platform software and purpose-built Accelerator Card, includes data compression, deduplication, and built-in backup.

Gartner labeled SimpliVity a leader in hyperconvergence, along with Cisco, EMC, Nutanix, and NetApp, in its Magic Quadrant for Integrated Systems last fall. In addition to offering an OmniCube appliance, SimpliVity teams with Cisco, Dell, Huawei, and Lenovo to integrate OmniStack into their servers.

“This transaction expands HPE’s software-defined capability and fits squarely within our strategy to make hybrid IT simple for customers,” Meg Whitman, HPE president and CEO, said in a statement.

 

HPE said it will continue to offer its own hyperconverged products, the HC 380 and HC 250, for existing customers and partners. The company jumped into the hyperconvergence nearly a year ago with the HC 380. SimpliVity customers and partners shouldn’t expect any immediate changes in product roadmap, according to HPE, which said it will continue to support them.

Within 60 days of the deal closing — which HPE expects in the second quarter of its fiscal year 2017 — the company plans to offer SimpliVity’s software qualified for its ProLiant DL380 servers. By the second half, it expects to offer a range of integrated HPE SimpliVity systems on ProLiant servers.

Dan Conde, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group and Interop ITX Review Board member, told me in an email that SimpliVity provides HPE with better differentiation in the hyperconverged infrastructure market. HPE’s own products aren’t built from the ground-up for hyperconvergence to the same extent as SimpliVity’s, he said.

“I think they [HPE] wanted some ‘secret sauce’,” Conde said.

Technology Business Research recently estimated that the market for hyperconverged platforms will reach $7.2 billion by 2020.

SimpliVity’s OmniCube made its way to Hollywood last year, when it was disguised as the Pied Piper box in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” television show.



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