Monthly Archives: June 2018

Red Hat Adds GPLv3 Cure Clause to its Code-Base » Linux Magazine


Red Hat has taken the next step to ensure that uses of its open source software are protected from any GNU GPL violations. Many companies mix different open source code base into their products and services. It could be challenging to keep up with the licences used for each component and any violation may lead to a court case and public shaming.

GNU GPLv3 added a cure clause that offers a grace period to violators to fix the violation and resume rights to use the code-base.

Red Hat said that all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start.

There have been some cases where companies using GPLed software were attacked by trolls and dragged in courts. It could very well become a business model for some desperate developers. However, Cure clause offers companies a grace period to fix any violation and avoid such situation.

Red Hat said in a blog post, “We are extending the GPLv3 termination policy to users of our GPLv2/LGPLv2.1 code because we consider it the right thing to do. The Cure permissions offer additional comfort level that users of our code have reasonable assurance of quiet use of that code, even if there is a temporary license noncompliance by a third party redistributing our code, due to misunderstanding or otherwise. We also believe that community adoption of these rights will reduce the opportunity for illegitimate forms of license enforcement. We hope that others will also join in this endeavor to reassure the open source community that good faith efforts to fix noncompliance will be embraced.”



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How to Check Disk Space on Linux from the Command Line | Linux.com


Quick question: How much space do you have left on your drives? A little or a lot? Follow up question: Do you know how to find out? If you happen to use a GUI desktop (e.g., GNOME, KDE, Mate, Pantheon, etc.), the task is probably pretty simple. But what if you’re looking at a headless server, with no GUI? Do you need to install tools for the task? The answer is a resounding no. All the necessary bits are already in place to help you find out exactly how much space remains on your drives. In fact, you have two very easy-to-use options at the ready.

In this article, I’ll demonstrate these tools. I’ll be using Elementary OS, which also includes a GUI option, but we’re going to limit ourselves to the command line. The good news is these command-line tools are readily available for every Linux distribution. On my testing system, there are a number of attached drives (both internal and external). The commands used are agnostic to where a drive is plugged in; they only care that the drive is mounted and visible to the operating system.

With that said, let’s take a look at the tools.

df

The df command is the tool I first used to discover drive space on Linux, way back in the 1990s. It’s very simple in both usage and reporting. To this day, df is my go-to command for this task. This command has a few switches but, for basic reporting, you really only need one. That command is df -H. The -H switch is for human-readable format. The output of df -H will report how much space is used, available, percentage used, and the mount point of every disk attached to your system (Figure 1).

What if your list of drives is exceedingly long and you just want to view the space used on a single drive? With df, that is possible. Let’s take a look at how much space has been used up on our primary drive, located at /dev/sda1. To do that, issue the command:

df -H /dev/sda1

The output will be limited to that one drive (Figure 2).

You can also limit the reported fields shown in the df output. Available fields are:

  • source — the file system source

  • size — total number of blocks

  • used — spaced used on a drive

  • avail — space available on a drive

  • pcent — percent of used space, divided by total size

  • target — mount point of a drive

Let’s display the output of all our drives, showing only the size, used, and avail (or availability) fields. The command for this would be:

df -H --output=size,used,avail

The output of this command is quite easy to read (Figure 3).

The only caveat here is that we don’t know the source of the output, so we’d want to include source like so:

df -H --output=source,size,used,avail

Now the output makes more sense (Figure 4).

du

Our next command is du. As you might expect, that stands for disk usage. The du command is quite different to the df command, in that it reports on directories and not drives. Because of this, you’ll want to know the names of directories to be checked. Let’s say I have a directory containing virtual machine files on my machine. That directory is /media/jack/HALEY/VIRTUALBOX. If I want to find out how much space is used by that particular directory, I’d issue the command:

du -h /media/jack/HALEY/VIRTUALBOX

The output of the above command will display the size of every file in the directory (Figure 5).

So far, this command isn’t all that helpful. What if we want to know the total usage of a particular directory? Fortunately, du can handle that task. On the same directory, the command would be:

du -sh /media/jack/HALEY/VIRTUALBOX/

Now we know how much total space the files are using up in that directory (Figure 6).

You can also use this command to see how much space is being used on all child directories of a parent, like so:

du -h /media/jack/HALEY

The output of this command (Figure 7) is a good way to find out what subdirectories are hogging up space on a drive.

The du command is also a great tool to use in order to see a list of directories that are using the most disk space on your system. The way to do this is by piping the output of du to two other commands: sort and head. The command to find out the top 10 directories eating space on a drive would look something like this:

du -a /media/jack | sort -n -r | head -n 10

The output would list out those directories, from largest to least offender (Figure 8).

Not as hard as you thought

Finding out how much space is being used on your Linux-attached drives is quite simple. As long as your drives are mounted to the Linux system, both df and du will do an outstanding job of reporting the necessary information. With df you can quickly see an overview of how much space is used on a disk and with du you can discover how much space is being used by specific directories. These two tools in combination should be considered must-know for every Linux administrator.

And, in case you missed it, I recently showed how to determine your memory usage on Linux. Together, these tips will go a long way toward helping you successfully manage your Linux servers.

Learn more about Linux through the free “Introduction to Linux” course from The Linux Foundation and edX.

5 Commands for Checking Memory Usage in Linux | Linux.com


The Linux operating system includes a plethora of tools, all of which are ready to help you administer your systems. From simple file and directory tools to very complex security commands, there’s not much you can’t do on Linux. And, although regular desktop users may not need to become familiar with these tools at the command line, they’re mandatory for Linux admins. Why? First, you will have to work with a GUI-less Linux server at some point. Second, command-line tools often offer far more power and flexibility than their GUI alternative.

Determining memory usage is a skill you might need should a particular app go rogue and commandeer system memory. When that happens, it’s handy to know you have a variety of tools available to help you troubleshoot. Or, maybe you need to gather information about a Linux swap partition or detailed information about your installed RAM? There are commands for that as well. Let’s dig into the various Linux command-line tools to help you check into system memory usage. These tools aren’t terribly hard to use, and in this article, I’ll show you five different ways to approach the problem.

I’ll be demonstrating on the Ubuntu Server 18.04 platform. You should, however, find all of these commands available on your distribution of choice. Even better, you shouldn’t need to install a single thing (as most of these tools are included).

With that said, let’s get to work.

top

I want to start out with the most obvious tool. The top command provides a dynamic, real-time view of a running system. Included in that system summary is the ability to check memory usage on a per-process basis. That’s very important, as you could easily have multiple iterations of the same command consuming different amounts of memory. Although you won’t find this on a headless server, say you’ve opened Chrome and noticed your system slowing down. Issue the top command to see that Chrome has numerous processes running (one per tab – Figure 1).

Chrome isn’t the only app to show multiple processes. You see the Firefox entry in Figure 1? That’s the primary process for Firefox, whereas the Web Content processes are the open tabs. At the top of the output, you’ll see the system statistics. On my machine (a System76 Leopard Extreme), I have a total of 16GB of RAM available, of which just over 10GB is in use. You can then comb through the list and see what percentage of memory each process is using.

One of the things top is very good for is discovering Process ID (PID) numbers of services that might have gotten out of hand. With those PIDs, you can then set about to troubleshoot (or kill) the offending tasks.

If you want to make top a bit more memory-friendly, issue the command top -o %MEM, which will cause top to sort all processes by memory used (Figure 2).

The top command also gives you a real-time update on how much of your swap space is being used.

free

Sometimes, however, top can be a bit much for your needs. You may only need to see the amount of free and used memory on your system. For that, there is the free command. The free command displays:

  • Total amount of free and used physical memory

  • Total amount of swap memory in the system

  • Buffers and caches used by the kernel

From your terminal window, issue the command free. The output of this command is not in real time. Instead, what you’ll get is an instant snapshot of the free and used memory in that moment (Figure 3).

You can, of course, make free a bit more user-friendly by adding the -m option, like so: free -m. This will report the memory usage in MB (Figure 4).

Of course, if your system is even remotely modern, you’ll want to use the -g option (gigabytes), as in free -g.

If you need memory totals, you can add the t option like so: free -mt. This will simply total the amount of memory in columns (Figure 5).

vmstat

Another very handy tool to have at your disposal is vmstat. This particular command is a one-trick pony that reports virtual memory statistics. The vmstat command will report stats on:

  • Processes

  • Memory

  • Paging

  • Block IO

  • Traps

  • Disks

  • CPU

The best way to issue vmstat is by using the -s switch, like vmstat -s. This will report your stats in a single column (which is so much easier to read than the default report). The vmstat command will give you more information than you need (Figure 6), but more is always better (in such cases).

dmidecode

What if you want to find out detailed information about your installed system RAM? For that, you could use the dmidecode command. This particular tool is the DMI table decoder, which dumps a system’s DMI table contents into a human-readable format. If you’re unsure as to what the DMI table is, it’s a means to describe what a system is made of (as well as possible evolutions for a system).

To run the dmidecode command, you do need sudo privileges. So issue the command sudo dmidecode -t 17. The output of the command (Figure 7) can be lengthy, as it displays information for all memory-type devices. So if you don’t have the ability to scroll, you might want to send the output of that command to a file, like so: sudo dmidecode –t 17 > dmi_infoI, or pipe it to the less command, as in sudo dmidecode | less.

/proc/meminfo

You might be asking yourself, “Where do these commands get this information from?”. In some cases, they get it from the /proc/meminfo file. Guess what? You can read that file directly with the command less /proc/meminfo. By using the less command, you can scroll up and down through that lengthy output to find exactly what you need (Figure 8).

One thing you should know about /proc/meminfo: This is not a real file. Instead /pro/meminfo is a virtual file that contains real-time, dynamic information about the system. In particular, you’ll want to check the values for:

  • MemTotal

  • MemFree

  • MemAvailable

  • Buffers

  • Cached

  • SwapCached

  • SwapTotal

  • SwapFree

If you want to get fancy with /proc/meminfo you can use it in conjunction with the egrep command like so: egrep –color ‘Mem|Cache|Swap’ /proc/meminfo. This will produce an easy to read listing of all entries that contain Mem, Cache, and Swap … with a splash of color (Figure 9).

Keep learning

One of the first things you should do is read the manual pages for each of these commands (so man top, man free, man vmstat, man dmidecode). Starting with the man pages for commands is always a great way to learn so much more about how a tool works on Linux.

Learn more about Linux through the free “Introduction to Linux” course from The Linux Foundation and edX.

KDE Plasma 5.13 Is Here » Linux Magazine


The KDE Project has announced the release of Plasma 5.13, the latest version of its desktop environment. KDE is known for its modular design and under-the-hood customization. However, at times these benefits come at the cost of resource efficiency. But as KDE is targeting mobile devices, this release takes advantage of that work and has been optimized to run smoothly on under-powered ARM laptops, high-end gaming PCs, and everything in between. Resource efficiency also means that on powerful machines, more resources will be free for applications instead of being consumed by the desktop itself.

Web browsers are the gateway to the Internet; Plasma 5.13 comes with browser integration that allows users to monitor and control supported browsers, including Chrome/Chromium and Firefox, from the desktop widget. Users will be able to play and pause media playing in web browsers, offering users better control over not only their own entertainment, but also to control annoying autoplaying videos embedded on websites.

The community has also improved the KDE Connect experience; users can now send links directly to phone using KDE Connect. The Media Control Widget has been redesigned with added support for the MPRIS specification, which means media players can now be controlled from the media controls in the desktop tray or from a phone using KDE Connect.

On the security side, Vaults, Plasma’s storage encryption utility, includes a new CryFS backend,
better error reporting, a more polished interface, and the ability to remotely open and close vaults via KDE Connect.

KDE already had good multi-monitor support, where you could even choose a customized layout for each monitor. The 5.13 release makes it easier to connect external monitors. When a new external monitor is connected, a dialog pops up offering the option to control the position of the additional monitor in correlation to the primary monitor.

The desktop has also received some visual upgrades, from the login screen to icons. Plasma 5.13 will appear in different distributions depending on their own release cycle, but users can test the latest release with KDE’s own distribution called “neon”. openSUSE Tumbleweed and Arch Linux will be among the first to offer this release.

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GitLabs Drops Pricing After Microsoft, GitHub A… » Linux Magazine


As the news broke that Microsoft was acquiring GitHub, panicked users started to move their accounts to GitLabs, a fully open source implementation of Linus Torvalds Git.

While many leading figures of the open source world argues that GitHub is actually now in a more accountable and reliable position compared to earlier, because Microsoft will be treading carefully so as to not stain the positive image the company has been building with the open source community.

However, that didn’t stop users from move away from GitHub. Sensing an opportunity, GitLabs dropped pricing for its self-hosted GitLab Ultimate plan and its hosted Gold plan; both plans are now available for free to open source projects and educational institutions.

In an interview to Frederic Lardinois of TechCrunch, GitLab CEO Sid Sijbrandij said, “Most education and open source projects don’t have access to enhanced security or performance management tools for their software projects. At GitLab, we are happy to have achieved a level of success that allows us to extend the full set of features to these important communities by offering GitLab Ultimate & GitLab Gold plans for free.”

A caveat, these prices have been dropped, but these users won’t get any commercial support form GitLabs that paying users get.



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